July 14: Palas de Rei to Melide

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Pilgrim Street
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A rock garden sculpture, with the cross of Santiago
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Hard to see against the sun, but Saint James as a pilgrim
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And a more modernistic rendition of a pilgrim
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The lonely troubadour paces the sunken road
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Whenever I see a sunken road like this, my mind immediately flashes to the American Civil War, with Rebel soldiers using the road as a naturally occurring feature  offering excellent defense.
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Somehow modern farm equipment seems out of place on these ancient routes.
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Carpets on the stone floor.  I think that is a first for this trip.
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So many flowers offered to the Madonna and child
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An old-fashioned confessional, still in use
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The parishioners at this church do it proud, placing so many flowers on the altar and around the statues, and keeping the altar linen immaculate and snowy white.
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This cemetery takes me back home to Louisiana.  Raised crypts are the norm throughout much of my home state.
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San Xulian is, for me, what the Latin Americans call a “tocayo,” someone who shares my name.  Julie-Julian-Julius, all of our names descend from Julius Cesar.  So I can’t help but have a special feeling for this church along the Way.
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James takes a breather along a long and hot stretch.
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Walking into a village or town is always a great feeling.  Chances for a cold drink, a snack, a rest.  Notice the large cockle shell welcoming pilgrims.
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My father primarily raised cattle, but we had some sheep, too.  Who can resist lambs?
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These round bales of hay again.  What is the advantage?
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And this yellow arrow, made of yellow cockle shells, is built right into the wall.  Hard to miss, which is great.